How A Furnace Works

A furnace works to keep a home warm in the winter and plays a critical part in the operation of an air conditioning system. It produce heat through the combustion of natural gas in the furnace's burner. The heat produced from this process then passes through a heat exchanger. Air from your home's return air ducts is blown over the heat exchanger, thus warming the air.  The furnace's blower then blows the warmed air into the ductwork, which carries and disperses the warmed air throughout the home.

During warmer months, the blower inside a furnace continues to circulate return air throughout the home--only this time, the return air has been cooled by being blown over the indoor coil portion of the home's split-system air conditioning system. The condensing coil is typically installed on top of the furnace. 

Energy efficiency -The efficiency of a furnace can be determined by its AFUE--or Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency. The minimum efficiency level for furnaces currently manufactured in the U.S. is 80% AFUE. A rating of "80% AFUE" means that for every dollar you spend heating your home; 80 cents are actually applied to the generation of warmth. Compared to many of the 60% AFUE furnaces in older homes, 80% AFUE furnaces are a significant improvement and we offer many full series of American Standard furnaces to meet your needs. However, for enhanced energy efficiency, you may wish to consider an American Standard 95+% AFUE furnace.

Putting a new system in a home that has not had central air and heat before will require the installation of ductwork, insulation, refrigerant piping, electrical service, wiring, thermostat, condensate piping, flue piping, flue terminations, chimney liner, slabs, filter, driers, registers, grills, drain pans and evaporator coil. Beyond equipment, the most important component installed with a new system, however, is the ductwork.

Ductwork is composed of two parts, supply and return. Supply duct is attached to the outflow of the new system, delivering air to each zone in a home. The amount of air reaching each zone is determined by the size of supply ductwork connecting it to your system. Your dealer will help you determine the size of all the supply ductwork in your home. The second part of the ductwork, the return duct, attaches to the inlet of the new system and draws air out of the spaces to be heated or cooled. Attached to the return duct is the filter. The filter should be placed as near to the furnace or air handler as possible. Ductwork can be either fiberglass or metal and must be properly sized in order to evenly distribute the proper amount of air to each room.


Need Help?
Fill out my online form.

When you select submit, All About Air will be sent an email with the information you provided. Please leave as much information as possible so we can quickly get back to you.

dog

Thank you for visiting All About Air Heating and Cooling! Please call us directly at 360.254.3008 for immediate assistance and service.